Dear Country Music Association, Prove You’re Not Racists By Featuring Beyonce, Dixie Chicks Performance


dearFor many Beyonce’s performance of the country inspired “Daddy’s Lessons” with the Dixie Chicks was a highlight of this week’s CMAs. But the Country Music Association has chosen not to promote the performance on their popular web site and social media channels.

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image from pbs.twimg.com

One of music’s biggest stars, Beyonce, performed at this week’s Country Music Awards with the help of the Dixie Chicks.  But you’d barely know that the performance ever happened, if you visit the web site and social media of the show’s creator, The Country Music Association. Some are even accusing the CMA of deleting Beyonce’ related posts after they were peppered with hateful and racist comments

CMA Country Music Association

from the CMA Facebook page

A search on mid-day Friday of the CMA’s popular social channels and web site found Beyonce featured only as part of an uncaptioned photo collage of many of the night’s performances.

But this morning the CMA’s issued a statement:

“CMA has not erased any mentions of Beyoncé’s performance on the CMA Awards.

In advance of the broadcast, CMA removed a five-second promotional clip from ABC.com and CMA’s Facebook page. The promo was unapproved and CMA removed it prior to the broadcast.

Beyoncé’s performance with Dixie Chicks was a highlight of the evening and we are continuing to share the amazing full-length performance clip via our official social channels.”

If Beyonce is featured on CMA social channels as stated, we – and other media outlets that we surveyed – could not find it. In fact, the performance clip that was included in today’s CMA statement linked to ABC TV, not to the CMA’s own site.

Dear Country Music Association…

The Country Music Association, which is both an effective advocate for country music and a strong supporter of many worthy charities – could end this controversy today by posting this performance on their site and social media.  

But they have deliberately chosen not to; and in doing so, they validate the hate and a narrow mindedness of what one hopes is a fraction of their audience. 

If country music wants to be a big tent, they don’t have to embrace Beyonce and The Dixie Chicks or what these haters believe they stand for, but they can’t pretend that they don’t exist.